Alchemy-Spetec Blog

Applications of Polyurethane: Void Fill, Slab Leveling, and Slab Lifting

Posted by Brian Dalinghaus on Jan 25, 2022 10:00:00 AM

Banner - Applications of Polyurethane

Body - Applications of PolyurethaneThis post is part of the Alchemy-Spetec Contractor Lens series, featuring views, news & case studies written by our customers. This article, written by Brian Dalinghaus of Dalinghaus Construction, examines the following applications of polyurethane: void fill, slab leveling, and slab lifting. If you're an Alchemy-Spetec customer and you'd like to discuss writing content for our blog, please send an email to marketing@alchemy-spetec.com today!

So, your sidewalk sunk into the muddy mire that used to be your backyard before Fifi dug it up. Or perhaps your cement patio has a new severe slant to it so that you shimmy folded-up pieces of paper underneath your picnic table to make it artificially level. Or maybe you have weak, non-loadbearing soil and your pool is starting to crack due to the strain. The question is: how do you lift and re-level large sections of concrete?

Polyurethane is a panacea, a cure-all, for a long list of soil-related issues. Polyurethane can lift, level, and densify weak soil. Dalinghaus Construction Inc. has been in the foundation repair industry for decades. We are here to educate you on everything to do with polyurethane, whether you choose to employ our services or go with another contractor.

In this article, you will learn the properties of polyurethane foam, how it is utilized for soil densification, slab lift & leveling, and void fill.

What is Polyurethane Foam?

Polyurethane foam is an injectable polyol and isocyanate resin sealant, insulation, grout which expands upon application providing void fill, structural support, and re-leveling properties. Polyurethane foam is waterproof, flame-retardant, noninvasive, and nonpolluting, weighing 3.5 to 5 pounds per cubic foot and reaching 90% compression strength after 15 minutes. Polyurethane can hold up to 7,200 pounds per square foot.

Polyurethane is injected as a liquid before it solidifies into its foam state. Due to the initial liquid form, polyurethane permeates into tight spaces, allowing it to penetrate weak soil and difficult to reach voids. This foam is environmentally inert, posing no danger to the environment or the evolutionarily finely tuned habitat that is your yard.

In other words, your children and your furry pets are safe. In fact, polyurethane itself is so safe it is used in pacemakers and other devices that can be safely implanted into the body.

At Dalinghaus Construction Inc., we utilize AP Lift 430, which is certified by Truesdail Labs to NSF / ANSI 61-5 (meaning it’s approved for contact with drinking water).

Fun Fact with Brian – Polyurethane has quickly usurped mudjacking due to its lighter weight and less invasive application system. Mudjacking slurry weighs up to 140 pounds per cubic foot (which just adds more weight to an already sinking slab). To find out why Polyurethane is a better option than mudjacking, read our article Polyurethane Injection vs Mudjacking (Weight, Application, & Cure Time).

Polyurethane Soil Densification

Polyurethane foam densifies weak, non-loadbearing, expansive soils, such as clays and lay stratum. The polyurethane is pumped deep into the soil (often at varying levels/intervals) and expands as a foam. The polyurethane foam fills gaps and underground pockets that compromise the structural integrity of the soil. This foam solidifies, strengthening the soil by adding light, water retardant support. Polyurethane soil densification can be used to mitigate landslides, for hillside stabilization, and deep injection.

Polyurethane Slab Lift & Leveling

Sidewalks, concrete patios, and backyard basketball courts can sink and become uneven. While it’s tempting to blame the slanted slab for your bad dribbling skills during a pick-up game, it’s always more fun and safer to walk across flat, level surfaces.

A flat working space is especially important in a warehouse environment. Polyurethane foam works beautifully at leveling warehouse slabs to ensure all the warehouse workers are safe. To learn more about warehouse safety, read our other Contractor Lens article on the Alchemy-Spetec blog, Warehouse Floor Repair.

Polyurethane is the perfect candidate to lift and re-level concrete surfaces, due to the expansive properties of the foam. As the foam expands, it pushes upwards, exerting a tremendous amount of force on the slab above, returning it to level.

Polyurethane Void Fill

Polyurethane foam is often utilized as a void fill after a slab lift during an underpinning project. When the affected section of the home is lifted, it leaves a void where the home had settled. Polyurethane is injected, the foam expands, and the void is filled with strong, durable, and supportive material.

*Note – The lifted section of the home always requires void fill (the last pier on each side is referred to as the void fill lifting point). The entire area beneath the slab doesn’t require void fill, only the affected area.

Polyurethane Projects

In this article, you learned about various applications of polyurethane foam in the construction world: soil densification, slab lift & leveling, and void fill.

If you want to learn how invasive polyurethane injection is, read our article 5 Steps to Polyurethane Foam Injection (From Drillholes to Cure).

We have over 100 years of combined experience in the foundation repair game. We are here to educate and assist, whether you ultimately choose us for your polyurethane services or not.

If you live in Southern California or Arizona and would like to book a free foundation inspection, click the link below...Dalinghaus Schedule Evaluation

Want more information on slab lifting with polyurethane?

Download an Info-Packed Slab Lift Brochure!

Topics: All Posts, Lift Slabs, Fill Voids

Geotech Training: March 29th - 31st, 2022

Posted by Kreg Thornley on Jan 18, 2022 10:00:00 AM

Banner - Geotech Training Program March 2022

Alchemy-Spetec HQ in Tucker, GA
Registration Deadline: Tuesday, March 1st

Click Here to Register NOW!

AS-Training-Program---Fall-2021$695 Registration Fee
$615 for each additional participant from
the same company.

Get ready for a thorough education in Slab Lifting, Soil Stabilization, the Alchemy-Spetec Deep Lift® process, equipment, and applications. You’ll get hands-on training from a technical staff with decades of on-the-job experience.

Tuesday, March 29th

  • Geotech Product Line Overview
  • Geotech Applications & Case Studies
  • PolyBadger® Demo & Training
  • Estimating & Quoting Jobs

Wednesday, March 30th

  • PMC Pump Demo & Training
  • Leak Seal Issues on Geotech Jobs
  • Ground Penetrating Radar Demo & Training
  • Slab Lift Rig Demo & Training
  • Competing Geotech Techniques

Thursday, March 31st

  • PolyShark® / Soil Stabilization Demo & Training (On-Site)
  • Deep Lift® Demo & Training (On-Site)

Your Instructors:

Andy Powell (Southeastern Regional Manager), Erik Prinzing (Midwest Regional Manager), Colt Hullander (Director of Technical Services - Geotech), Patrick Zito (Eastern Regional Manager), Joel Bryant (Western Regional Manager).

Click Here to Register NOW!

Topics: Equipment & Accessories, All Posts, Lift Slabs, Stabilize Soil, Business Tips, Deep Lift, Fill Voids

Winterizing a PolyBadger

Posted by Erik Prinzing on Nov 30, 2021 10:00:00 AM

Banner - Winterizing a PolyBadger

Body - Winterizing a PolyBadgerAs the weather gets colder, contractors in some regions will need to prepare their PolyBadger Lifting Systems for storage during the off-season. We're providing step-by-step instructions for that procedure in this article.

Prepping a PolyBadger for Winter Storage

  1. Establish power to the cabinet and heat the hose (A heater, B heater, and hose) to the target temperature of 130° F.
  2. Introduce material to the cabinet.
  3. Turn the air supply on and recirculate to heat up the ISO and resin.
  4. Once the PolyBadger is up to temperature, turn off the air supply and remove airlines from the stick pumps.
  5. Remove the supply and the recirculation line from the A-side stick pump.
  6. Drain all the remaining material from the pump and clean with brake cleaner.
  7. Place the stick A side stubby stick pump into a 5-gallon pail of the AP Flush 121.
  8. Reconnect the supply line and leave the recirculation line to drain in a purge pail.
  9. Repeat steps 5-8 on the B-side stick pump.
  10. Reconnect air supply to stick pumps, hold return lines in a purge pail, and slowly open the air valve on the stick pumps.
  11. You will notice material slowly pushed out of the recirculation line into the purge pail. Continue to pump AP Flush 121 through the system until it comes out of the recirculation line clear, with no added color or debris.
  12. Shut the air valve supplying the stick pumps. This will stop the flow of material.
  13. Reconnect the recirculation lines to the appropriate stick pump and tighten.
  14. Turn the recirculation pump valves to supply the hose.
  15. You can remove the Handi Gun or leave it on for this stage, holding the hose in the purge pail. Turn on the supply valves on the end of the hose just before the Handi Gun. Slowly open the air valve on the stick pumps and pull the trigger on the gun.
  16. You will notice material slowly pushed out of the hose line into the purge pail. Continue to pump AP Flush 121 through the system until it comes out of the hose line clear, with no added color or debris.
  17. Shut the air valve supplying the stick pumps. This will stop the flow of material.
  18. Remove the stick pumps from the AP Flush 121. (Make sure to mark your pails A and B for future use).
  19. Insert stick pumps into AP Pump Saver 195. (Make sure to mark your pails A and B for future use)
  20. Push the AP Pump Saver 195 through the hose line. You will notice the AP Flush 121 slowly pushed out of the hose line into the purge pail. Continue to pump AP Pump Saver 195 through the system until it comes out of the hose line clear (you will notice a thick, clean fluid).
  21. Turn off supply valves on the hose just before the Handi Gun.
  22. Disconnect the air supply to the stick pumps.
  23. Move the hose supply valve into recirculation position to depressurize the system.
  24. Shut off supply valves to the cabinet.
  25. Turn off heat zones.
  26. Turn off the main disconnect.
  27. Remove residual grease from interior cabinet pumps.
  28. Replace with new grease.

Want more information on the PolyBadger?

Download an Info-Packed PolyBadger System Brochure!

Topics: Equipment & Accessories, All Posts, Lift Slabs

Slab Lifting at a High School in Buffalo, New York

Posted by Colt Hullander on Nov 18, 2021 10:00:00 AM

Banner - Slab Lifting at a High School in Buffalo, New York

Body - Slab Lifting at a High School in Buffalo, New YorkA general contractor working for a school district in Buffalo, New York was asked to lift and level around 550 feet of sidewalk slabs at a local high school. The general contractor called in slab lifting specialists Gernatt Spray Foam to get the job done. Since sunken slabs often result in trip hazards, getting the job done quickly and permanently was a top priority.

Powerful Polymer

The slab lifting crew showed up on the scene armed with AP Lift 435 high-strength polyurethane and several Jack Attack devices.

Painless Procedure

Gernatt Spray Foam leveled all 550 feet of sunken sidewalk slabs with total precision. They performed lifts ranging from 0.5 to 6 inches, depending on the slab. In some cases, they lifted with polyurethane only and in others, they raised the slab with the jacking devices before injecting the polyurethane underneath.

Rapid Result

The entire job was completed in only two days. The general contractor and school administrators were both amazed at the efficiency and surgical precision of the polyurethane slab lifting method.

Want more information about slab lifting with polyurethane?

Download an Info-Packed Slab Lift Brochure!

Topics: All Posts, Lift Slabs

Contractors Complete Fall 2021 Geotech Training

Posted by Kreg Thornley on Nov 11, 2021 9:30:00 AM

Banner - Contractors Complete Fall 2021 Geotech Training

Body - Contractors Complete Fall 2021 Geotech TrainingOn October 26th - 28th, Contractors across North America traveled to Alchemy-Spetec HQ in Tucker, GA for a thorough education in Slab Lifting, Soil Stabilization, the Deep Lift® process, equipment, and applications. They received hands-on training from a technical staff with decades of on-the-job experience.

This three-day geotech bootcamp featured presentations and demos on the following subjects:

  • Geotech Product Line Overview
  • Geotech Applications & Case Studies
  • PolyBadger® Demo & Training
  • Estimating & Quoting Jobs
  • PMC Pump Demo & Training
  • Leak Seal Issues on Geotech Jobs
  • Ground Penetrating Radar Demo & Training
  • Slab Lift Rig Demo & Training
  • Competing Geotech Techniques
  • PolyShark® / Soil Stabilization Demo & Training (On-Site)
  • Deep Lift® Demo & Training (On-Site)

All of us here at Alchemy-Spetec would like to thank everyone who participated! and extend an invitation to those who missed this event to sign up below for notifications on future training programs.

Sign Up to Get Notified for Future Training Events

Topics: Equipment & Accessories, All Posts, Lift Slabs, Stabilize Soil, Business Tips, Deep Lift, Fill Voids

Winterizing a Slab Lifting Rig

Posted by Stephen C. Barton on Nov 4, 2021 10:00:00 AM

Banner - Winterizing a Slab Lifting Rig

Body - Winterizing a Slab Lifting RigAs the weather gets colder, contractors in some regions will need to prepare their slab lifting rigs for storage during the off-season. We're providing step-by-step instructions for that procedure in this article.

Please Note:

  • You will notice that more care is given to the A-side of the system, this is normal.
  • This procedure assumes you are using a PMC pump.

Prepping a Slab Lifting Rig for Winter Storage

  1. Remove and clean the A and B stick pumps. Clean the exterior of the pumps with brake cleaner to remove as much residual resin and polyol as possible.
  2. Place the A-Side transfer pump into a 5-gallon pail of the AP Flush 121.
  3. Remove the recirculation hose from the A-Side drum and place it in a purge pail.
  4. Open A-Side inlet valve and recirculation valve on your PMC machine.
  5. Slowly open the air valve on the A-Side transfer pump to start introducing the AP Flush 121 through the A-Side of the machine.
  6. You will notice iso material being pushed out of the recirculation line into the purge pail. Continue to pump AP Flush 121 through the system until it comes out of the recirculation line clear, with no added coloring or debris.
  7. Shut the air supply feeding the transfer pump. This will stop all flow of material.
  8. Un-cap the A-Side of the PMC whip hose. Once un-capped, place the hose into the purge pail.
  9. Close the recirculation valve on the A-Side of the PMC machine.
  10. Slowly open the air valve on the A-Side transfer pump to start the flow of AP Flush 121 through the heated hose.
  11. You will notice iso material being pushed out of the whip hose into the purge pail. Continue to pump AP Flush 121 through the system until it comes out of the recirculation line clear, with no added coloring or debris.
  12. Now that this process is complete, the A-Side has been completely cleaned of any iso material.
  13. Remove the A-Side transfer pump from the pail of AP Flush 121 and place it into a 5-gallon pail of AP Lube 190.
  14. Slowly open the air valve on the A-Side transfer pump to start introducing the AP Lube 190 through the A-Side of the machine. Continue to pump the AP Lube 190 until you have pure and clean AP Lube 190 coming out of the end of the whip hose
  15. Place the B-Side stick pump into a separate 5-gallon pail of AP Lube 190.
  16. Slowly open the air valve on the B-Side transfer pump to start introducing the AP Lube 190 through the B-Side of the machine and heated hose. Continue to pump AP Lube 190 through the system until it comes out of the end of the whip hose, with no added coloring or debris.
  17. Once the entire system is full of clean AP Lube 190, slowly start to recirculate the AP Lube 190 through the entire system. When doing this, it is best to let the PMC machine cycle while recirculating the AP lube 190.
  18. Once all these steps are complete, close the air on each transfer pump and re-cap the heated PMC whip hoses.

Want more information on geotech products and equipment?

Download the Info-Packed Geotech Product Catalog!

Topics: Equipment & Accessories, All Posts, Lift Slabs

Lifting Slabs in Cold Weather

Posted by Andy Powell on Oct 26, 2021 10:00:00 AM

Banner - Lifting Slabs in Cold Weather 2021

Body - Lifting Slabs in Cold Weather 2021It's that time of year again. As temperatures drop, take a moment to review this previously posted article packed with cold-weather tips.

Contrary to popular opinion, as a contractor, you don’t have to put up your equipment and rigs due to cold weather. There are many jobs to be done and many ways to keep your material conditioned. Use this season to your advantage and gain valuable business.

Cold Weather Markets

Seasonal attractions such as theme parks are a great place to start looking for winter work. Many of these parks (the ones that aren’t in Orlando) shut down for the winter and this is the time they do maintenance and repairs. Think of all the concrete lifting and leveling that can be done.

Factories can be less active in the winter months with production slowing down in many industries. This is a good time for them to do maintenance and floor repairs as well.

Warehouses typically operate year-round, so there is always work available. Warehouse floors are used and abused on a daily basis and will sooner or later need some form of repairs done to keep business running at a steady pace. In addition, many warehouses have dangerous voids beneath their floors that require repair.  

Exterior concrete slabs are still worth considering, even in the cold weather. These slabs experience the most wear and tear from the environment itself (think erosion) and daily traffic. You’ll need to lift concrete slabs before the ground freezes and only after your materials have been thoroughly conditioned.

Conditioning Materials

Your slab lifting equipment probably has built-in heaters and a heated hose. Each brand and model of pump has different sized pre-heaters and different ∆T (∆ = Delta and T = Temperature). This sounds complicated but is actually quite simple.  ∆T is simply the change in temperature.  Let’s say your material has been sitting in a cold trailer all night and the temperature has dropped to 40 degrees F. If the required temperature of your B side material is 120 degrees F, then your pump better be rated with a ∆T of at least 80 degrees. However, if your material is preconditioned to 70 degrees F, then your machine only has to be rated for a ∆T of 50 degrees. As I said, every machine is rated differently based on the size of the heaters. What is important to know is that there are limitations to how much heating your machine can do.

Keeping your materials conditioned in the winter months is a lot easier than it sounds. The main point is to keep your AP Lift products above 60 degrees at all times. Keeping the polyurethane at or above that temperature can be accomplished in a number of ways.

If you have an insulated rig, it should stay around 40 degrees warmer than outside temperatures. Most foam rigs have built-in electric heaters that require an extension cord to a power outlet at the job site or at your facility for overnight storage. Alternately, you could buy an electric radiator heater. Other available heating devices include drum band heaters and heated drum mats (be careful not to scorch the polymers by turning band heaters up too high). For a more DIY approach, you could build a hot box around the material storage area in your rig.

Heat Sink

Another consideration when lifting cold slabs is the heat sink factor. AP Lift products come out of the gun hot and get even hotter as they react. However, cold concrete acts as a heat sink and sucks the energy out of the foam as it starts to react. This can slow down the reaction speed of the foam. If you are pumping into a void, it will have little effect because most of the foam is not in contact with the concrete. If you are trying to lift a slab with little void, it will have more of an effect because more of the foam is in contact with the cold concrete and cold soil. More volume = more energy.

Conclusion

Don’t let common preconceptions deter you from slab lifting in cold weather. As noted above, there is no need to shut down completely for the upcoming winter months if you don’t want to. Opportunities still exist and one of them may just be the job you’ve been looking for all year. There are many ways to keep your equipment and materials conditioned to efficiently work in lower temperatures. Have more questions about slab lifting in cold weather? Call us at 404-618-0438.

Want more in-depth info on slab lifting?

Download an Info-Packed Slab Lift Brochure!

Topics: Equipment & Accessories, All Posts, Lift Slabs, Business Tips

Polyurethane Injection vs Mudjacking

Posted by Brian Dalinghaus on Oct 21, 2021 10:00:00 AM

Banner - Polyurethane Injection vs Mudjacking

Body - Polyurethane Injection vs MudjackingThis post is part of the Alchemy-Spetec Contractor Lens series, featuring views, news & case studies written by our customers. This article, written by Brian Dalinghaus of Dalinghaus Construction, contrasts polyurethane slab lifting vs mudjacking (lifting slabs with a mortar-based mixture of "mud" or "slurry"). If you're an Alchemy-Spetec customer and you'd like to discuss writing content for our blog, please send an email to marketing@alchemy-spetec.com today!

Do you have a sinking slab that needs a lift? There are two primary lifting services in the construction industry capable of lifting, stabilizing, and leveling your foundation/flatwork: polyurethane injection and mudjacking.

If you read our blog, keep up with our Instagram, or watch our Youtube channel, then you’ve undoubtedly heard a lot about polyurethane…but not much about mudjacking. 

This is because we tend not to write extensively on services we do not provide – however, in this article, we are going to analyze the 3-key benefits of polyurethane slab lifting over mudjacking:

  1. Lighter Weight
  2. Smaller Hole Size for Application
  3. Faster Cure Time 

What is Mudjacking?

Mudjacking is the lifting or leveling of a structure, driveway, or slab of concrete by pumping a mixture of slurry (with incredibly high pressure) underneath a sunken slab.

Polyurethane Weighs Less

Polyurethane weighs 2-4 pounds per cubic foot. Mud can weigh as much as 100 pounds per cubic foot. Weight is important because it can act as an anchor, sinking an already settling ship.

Polyurethane can help stabilize soil by adding rigidity – mudjacking simply packs on more weight. Yes, mudjacking is extremely effective at lifting settled flatwork and is attractive because of its relatively cheap cost, but it is not a long-term solution.

The mud will eventually settle into the expansive soil.

Polyurethane floats on expansive clays and only settles when the soil beneath it gives way. Polyurethane is lightweight, dense, and incredibly strong.

Polyurethane relies on the expansive pressure for the lift. Mudjacking relies on installation pressure.

Fun Facts with Brian – Polyurethane expands kind of like shaving cream after leaving a can, allowing it to fit perfectly into crooks and crannies as it balloons outward.   

Polyurethane Utilizes Smaller Application Holes

Polyurethane and Mudjacking follow the same three-step system: DrillPumpPatch.

The biggest difference in the system itself is the size of the application hole.  

Poly & Mudjacking’s Three Steps –

  • Drill – Drill into the concrete (often in a grid pattern)
  • Pump – Void fill the hole with a slurry application gun
  • Patch – Patch holes and color code the concrete to match

The polyurethane injection site hole is only 3/8" to 5/8” (depending on the type of injection), whereas mudjacking injection holes are 2 to 3 inches.   

Unless you want your driveway looking like a Dalmatian, we suggest utilizing polyurethane. The patched injection sites are far less noticeable.

In addition, mudjacking can prove a bit of a mess, with excess slurry slurping out of cracks and crevices. The polyurethane foam, once dry, is easy to square off with a boxcutter.

Polyurethane Cures Faster Than Mud

Polyurethane cures quickly, solidifying up to 90% full strength in 15 minutes. In contrast, mudjacking slurry shot underneath the slab is never exposed to sunlight (thus taking a much longer time to cure).    

The truth is: slurry can take several days to a week to dry. And, fun fact about concrete, it never really fully cures.

Why Choose Polyurethane Injection? 

Polyurethane is lightweight, easy to install with little chance of a mess, and cures incredibly fast. Mudjacking, on the other hand, is not a permanent fix and can sink your flat-work.  

If you live in Southern California or Central Arizona and would like a FREE void fill inspection, click the link below -

Daulinghaus Void Fill Inspection
Want more information on polyurethane slab lifting?

Download an Info-Packed Slab Lift Brochure!

Topics: All Posts, Lift Slabs

Repairing Warehouse Slabs with Polyurethane

Posted by Kreg Thornley on Oct 19, 2021 10:00:00 AM

Banner - Repairing Warehouse Slabs with Polyurethane

Body - Repairing Warehouse Slabs with PolyurethaneThe warehouse slab/floor repair market can be a goldmine for contractors. Most major metro areas contain endless square miles of warehouse space. That's why we've posted a good number of warehouse floor and slab repair articles on this blog over the years. In this post, we'll introduce and link to the best Alchemy-Spetec warehouse slab repair articles.

Warehouse and Industrial Slab Repair With Polyurethane

One of the hidden dangers a warehouse or industrial property owner and their employees can face is an unstable or sunken slab with a large void underneath.  The last thing anyone wants is injury and/or a lawsuit resulting from an un-repaired trip hazard or worse - a complete slab collapse. The video in the Read More link below depicts a real-time example of a warehouse slab with cavernous voids below and heavy equipment resting on top.  Next, you'll see the slab repair process in action as the voids are filled and the slabs are restored to a safe, stable state with AP Lift foams that support between 7,200 - 14,000 pounds per square foot (depending on the product selected). Click to Watch the Video and Read More.

Repair Unlevel Warehouse Slabs with AP Lift 475

Voids beneath warehouse floors can be filled with AP Lift 475 foam. This product is great for slabs that rock and warehouse floors that have begun to sink. The video in the Read More link below shows an example of the product in action. Inside this warehouse, the floors have begun to rock and are unleveled - which can speed up the wear and tear on valuable equipment. With this powerful polymer and its painless application procedures, unlevel slabs can be repaired at a rapid pace. Take a look for yourself! Click to Watch the Video and Read More.

Repairing Dangerous Sunken Slabs in Warehouses and Factories

Safety is the number one priority for factory and warehouse managers across the country.  Emphasis is most often placed on training employees to wear the right personal protective equipment and observe safety procedures when operating machinery - and rightly so!  In addition, it's also important for management to consider the state of the concrete slab floors. Click to Read More.

Case Study: Waterproofing Warehouse Slabs

In this case study, Charlie "The Grout Geek" Lerman shares a story about waterproofing warehouse slabs. There was a distribution center in North Carolina sitting on land that had a high water table. Eventually, the slabs in this 100,000 square foot building began to accumulate moisture. There were offices next to the warehouse area. The moisture that was seeping through the concrete slabs was first noticed as the carpet in the office area began to get damp. Click to Read More.

Stabilizing Slabs in an Omaha Warehouse with the PolyBadger

Not too long ago, Alchemy-Spetec customer Sudbeck Construction was called in by the property owner because he had noticed four slabs that were shifting up and scraping against a wall when forklifts crossed them. The crew drilled a couple of preliminary holes in the slabs for diagnostic purposes and discovered voids underneath ranging from 12-18 inches in depth. The Sudbeck team injected 35 gallons of AP Lift 430 beneath the slabs to stabilize them. This high-strength polyurethane foam provides a solid, reliable, long-lasting base underneath the concrete to prevent future shifting or sinking. Click to Read More.

Want more information on warehouse floor and slab repair?

Download an Info-Packed Warehouse & Industrial Slab Repair Brochure!

Topics: All Posts, Lift Slabs, Seal Leaks, Stabilize Soil

Polyurethane Estimating Calculator & Leak Seal Material Selection Guide

Posted by Kreg Thornley on Oct 12, 2021 10:00:00 AM

Banner - Alchemy-Spetec App

The Alchemy-Spetec app now includes a Leak Seal Material Selection Guide, along with the Polyurethane Estimating Calculator.  The Leak Seal Product Selection guide asks you a series of Yes/No questions about your job and then provides product recommendations.  The Polyurethane Estimating Calculator takes the guesswork out of estimating material for Leak Seal, Geotech, and Floor Repair jobs. Here's a step-by-step guide...

Download the Alchemy-Spetec App & Create an Account

1. Download the app.
Search Alchemy-Spetec in your Apple App Store or Google Play Store to install the app.

Polyurethane-Estimating-Calculator-&-Leak-Seal-Product-Selection-Guide-1

2. Create an account.
After installing the app, create an account by clicking "Sign Up" at the bottom and following the prompts.

Polyurethane-Estimating-Calculator-&-Leak-Seal-Product-Selection-Guide-8

Select a Leak Seal Product for Your Job

1. Tap the three lines in the top left corner to display the application options.  Choose Leak Seal Material Selection Guide.

Polyurethane-Estimating-Calculator-&-Leak-Seal-Product-Selection-Guide54

2. Answer a series of Yes/No questions about your leak seal job.

Polyurethane-Estimating-Calculator-&-Leak-Seal-Product-Selection-Guide-10

3. Review the product recommendation screen (and/or click the Start Over button at the bottom to begin again). Call the Alchemy-Spetec support squad at 404-618-0438 for more guidance specific to your project.

Polyurethane-Estimating-Calculator-&-Leak-Seal-Product-Selection-Guide-125

NOTE: You can also access the Leak Seal Material Selection Guide via this red button in the top right corner of our website home page...

Estimate Material for Your Leak Seal, Geotech, or Floor Repair Job

1. Tap the three lines in the top left corner to display the application options. Choose Material Estimation Calculator, then choose Geotech (Slab Lifting & Void Fill), Leak Seal, or Floor Repair for your job type.

Polyurethane-Estimating-Calculator-&-Leak-Seal-Product-Selection-Guide-2

2. Select the measuring system you want to use.

Polyurethane-Estimating-Calculator-&-Leak-Seal-Product-Selection-Guide-6

3. The Slab Lifting calculator appears by default. You can switch to the Void Filling calculator by clicking the button at the bottom right. Choose your product and fill in the square feet of your slab, plus the inches it has settled (or inches of void if using the Void Filling calculator).

Polyurethane-Estimating-Calculator-&-Leak-Seal-Product-Selection-Guide-14
4. View the recommended material quantities. Call the Alchemy-Spetec support squad at 404-618-0438 for more guidance specific to your project.

Alchemy-Spetec Estimator App Results

Want more information on Alchemy-Spetec products?

Download the Info-Packed Geotech Product Catalog!

Download the Info-Packed Leak Seal Product Catalog!

Topics: All Posts, Lift Slabs, Seal Leaks, Business Tips, Floor Repair, Fill Voids